hartman jack  
  Jack Hartman

 
 
  • Presented by Mike and Kathy Riordan
  • Winningest coach in K-State basketball history
  • Had 589 coaching victories at all collegiate levels
 
     
Hartman, Jack
Inducted 1990

Born: November 25, 1925 – Dewey, OK

Died: November 6, 1998

Graduated: Shidler (OK) High School, 1943; Oklahoma State University, 1950; MS – Oklahoma State University, 1954

Overview

Kansas State University’s all-time win leader in men’s basketball, Coach Jack Hartman was known for taking teams with less talent and consistently beating opposing teams with more during his 16 years from 1971 to 1986.

Playing Career

Hartman was a two-sport star at Oklahoma State, where he learned the basketball trade from the incomparable Henry Iba and played quarterback on the football team where he earned All-Missouri Valley Conference honors.  He played one year of professional football for Saskatchewan of the CFL, earning all-league honors before he began his coaching career at Plainville (KS) High School in 1951.

Early Coaching Highlights

Hartman moved on and spent seven years at Coffeyville Community College where his 1962 team finished 32-0 as NJCAA national champions.   He then spent seven years at Southern Illinois where his 1967 squad won the NIT championship.

Hartman at K-State

Hartman then moved to Kansas State University where he became the winningest coach in that school’s history.  Compiling a 295-169 record at Kansas State, he guided the Wildcats to three Big-Eight regular season championships, two Big-Eight tourney crowns, seven NCAA tourney appearances, one CCA appearance, and one NIT berth.   Hartman registered 20 or more wins seven times at K-State.  He was named the NABC National Coach of the Year in 1981.  Hartman tutored future pros Mike Evans, Rolando Blackman and Ed Nealy at KSU and Walt Frazier at Southern Illinois.  He also coached the U.S. Pan-American team to the 1983 gold medal.  In 23 years at the NCAA division I level, Hartman was 439-233. His incredible total career win-loss record, at all collegiate levels, stands at 589-279.

Presented by Mike & Kathy Riordan